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Old 11-15-2011, 01:11 AM   #15
BRaWNy
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: H E L L A S
Posts: 504
Training Exp: ~23 years
Training Type: Other
Fav Exercise: Back Squat
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They suppose to target the whole posterior chain, I don't do them specific for a region of it.
But everybody has a different body structure, weaknesses, strengths, levers etc.
I personally never feel it, or in general with Deadifts, at the waist/lower back, never had a problem also there (injuries etc).
I feel it mostly at hams, glutes and upper back/traps.

Both executions Deadstop and/or with stretch reflex create an overload in the stretched position. The stretch reflex does so by putting the muscle tissue under a large strain due to the "whipping" effect of rapidly switching from eccentric to concentric. The Deadstop does so by forcing the muscle tissue to do the whole job (taking out the stretch reflex) thus having to contract harder*.
Both are in some way equaly effective.

(*so they target my hams/glutes etc as good as with stretch reflex or even more)

A stretch reflex rep is "easier" than a deadstop rep. Easier not in the sense that it is less effective or easier to perform. Easier in the sense that you can lift more weight this way.

But this is relative, there are exercises or levers, or with a different body structure, or with a different use (for example you use more deadstop and less stretch reflex style), sometimes you can find that you are stronger or it's easier with deadstop.

Pulling exercises by nature start from a deadstop (or with the concentric move first if you want), like deads, pull-ups etc.
So by nature you can find yourself better performing at these with deadstop.
But as I said it's always relative, not standard.
__________________

Back Squat (parallel) - 200kg x 1
Back Squat (below parallel) - 180kg x 2
Deadstop Back Squat (just above parallel) - 190kg x 1
Deadstop Back Squat (parallel) - 165kg x 1
Deadstop Front Squat (parallel) - 140kg x 1
Deadstop Front Squat (just above parallel) - 165kg x 1
Sumo Pull (below knees) - 215kg x 1
Rack Pull (from knees) - 250kg x 2
Rack Snatch High Pull - 140kg x 1
Pin Floor Press - 155kg x 1
Bench Press - 145kg x 1
BTN Push Press - 95kg x 2

Last edited by BRaWNy; 11-15-2011 at 05:26 AM.
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