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Old 11-14-2011, 12:14 PM   #2
Soldier
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Join Date: May 2011
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When I was still in high school I was very interested in becoming a strength and conditioning coach. I looked into it a little.

How old are you? I ask because basically you need to persue one of only a small number of college degrees, and there are certainly things you can do in high school to prepare you. A big one is to start taking some classes like anatomy, in which you'll be able to start learning about the human body.

The following is from wikipedia, as far as qualifications;

"The National Strength and Conditioning Association offers a Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach qualification that is usually required for positions in the field. In addition to the C.S.C.S. certification needed to become a strength and conditioning coach, a Bachelor's degree in the field of Exercise Science or Kinesiology is also required. Most strength coaches go on to get their Master's degree as well as additional certifications, such as the Health and Fitness Specialist (H.F.S.) certification through the American College of Sports Medicine."

Basically you'll need a degree in either exercise science or kinesiology, both of which are very involved programs with intensive academincs. Like most any specialized field, the more prestigious the school you go to the greater your choices will be once you get out and start looking for work.

Along with your degree you'll also want to get as many certifications as possible, and conitnue to persue ongoing education even after you enter the field if you want to stay up to date on your information and techniques.

Of course, you won't get a job as a head strength coach right out of school, but there are other entry level assistant positions out there. With such a specific field, you'll find that networking is also extremely important. Meet as many people as possible who are in any way related to the training field and keep up with them as you go through school. It just takes one right person to get you in.
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