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Old 11-04-2011, 12:26 PM   #2
BendtheBar
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 79,798
Training Exp: 20+ years
Training Type: Powerbuilding
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My personal opinion is to stick with rep ranges on heavy days that allow for some progression. I would often work from the 5 to 8 rep range for a given weight, and once I reached 8 reps, I would add more weight. Of course with deadlifts, lower rep sets are often better...perhaps stick with 5's.

Heavy days don't have to be lower reps (under 5), especially if muscle building is a goal. They are primarily just the most taxing training days using the more effective compound lifts.

I would advise you to pick a rep range and progression scheme that you enjoy, and simply focus on adding reps to each set at every opportunity. Add weight when you can.

Lighter days I would focus on "less impactful" lifts (tax the CNS and joints to a milder degree), such as 20 rep squats or lighter squats, dips, pull ups, Arnold presses...that sort of thing.

I don't want to see a lighter day too easy, but I do want it to go easier on the CNS and joints.
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Last edited by BendtheBar; 11-04-2011 at 12:30 PM.
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