View Single Post
Old 10-07-2011, 08:10 AM   #6
Off Road
Senior Member
Max Brawn
Points: 17,091, Level: 83 Points: 17,091, Level: 83 Points: 17,091, Level: 83
Activity: 1% Activity: 1% Activity: 1%
 
Off Road's Avatar
 
Tournaments Won: 9

Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 7,607
Reputation: 786994
Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!Off Road is one with Crom!
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rippednmichigan View Post
Sorry it took so long to reply crazy busy, but I'm here.

First question is atough one and I don't think one can acurately measure, correct me if I'm wrong? People train with different intensities, nutrition and programs so size gain could very well be scewed by inflamation or water retention.

Can you clarify your second question?

Sent from my Epic 4G with Tapatalk
Sure, no problem. This is a topic that I find interesting.

I've heard it said, and I tend to agree with it, that genetic potential for size gains will partition out to ~75% dry muscle (Myofibrillar) and ~25% energy storage (Sarcoplasmic). So my question is; If these numbers are close to accurate, what percentage of your training should be devoted to each type of hypertrophy?

Training for energy storage (Sarcoplasmic) only accounts for ~25% of your genetic potential, but most bodybuilders put a larger emphasis on high rep "bodybuilder" type training. Does this type of training demand that kind of emphasis?

Training for dry muscle (Myofibrillar) accounts for a much larger percent of your genetic potential, yet bodybuilders seem to do far less of this low rep type training. Is this type of training more economical and therefore requires less overall attention in your routine?
Off Road is offline   Reply With Quote