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Old 09-27-2011, 03:01 PM   #13
big_swede
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pull14 View Post
Going along with what the others have said, yes they are fun to perform and can do quite a bit in the strength/physique departments. It will take a long time to learn and perfect the lifts, so I'd suggest you just spent 10-15 minutes before or after your lifting and practice technique with an empty bar. It would also be great if you could get your hands on a camera so that you can review the lifts. This allow you to still focus on the "slow" lifts but also get technique work in for the oly lifts. When you feel that technique is good, you can start adding the lifts to your programming.

The slow lifts (squat,bench, dead, press) can and should be used along with the Olympic lifts. As for over training... training in weightlifting is all about adaptation.

The importance of the o-lifts in your program will depend on goals. If you want to focus on the snatch/c&j than all work will focus around them. If you simply want to add these lifts AS assistance, then it doesn't matter as much since the o-lift is the assistance and not the main lift.
Spot on.
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