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Old 09-02-2011, 11:49 AM   #9
Trevor Lane
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GT-R View Post
Not to put you in the spotlight or correct you, but rather for educational purposes: There is such a thing as too much protein. There have been studies linking excessive protein intake and kidney problems. That's neither here nor there really; your recommendation of 1.2g is not going to pose risk to the health of an athlete.



As Off-Road called it, you want to be looking at 1.2g per pound of LBM. With skinnier people the recommendation of per pound of body weight is not going to hurt anyone, but when you're dealing with obese individuals, specifically the really heavy guys, their intake could be far too excessive.

There have been several studies, which can be found on pubmed, that show .8g-1.2g per pound of LBM is sufficient for athletes. If you're bulking, 1.5 isn't going to hurt, but 2g per pound of LBM offers little to no benefit.

Again, this is in the context of an individual who trains frequently and regularly.
Like I said, no such thing as too much at least from food Who gives a **** if your kidneys or liver work, as long as you can squat like a mother****er and look like a mass of twisting steel!

Last edited by Trevor Lane; 09-02-2011 at 11:54 AM.
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