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Old 08-07-2011, 09:47 AM   #3
Chillen
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Join Date: Feb 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post
Anyone know the background on this notion that if you sleep right after eating it immediately turns into fat? As far as I can remember this myth has been perpetuated but I don't ever recall finding out how it started.
This is a MYTH on face value.

The body is quite the complex system, and we have only figured out just a small portion of this complex system. One's metabolism is also very complex, and can vary person to person.

What we do know just by common sense, is that the body (while sleeping) does not burn that many calories, but is quite the work horse, nonetheless at this important time of the day. Speaking in terms of "average person" (with no hormal medical conditions), the body seems to work in a trend history.

For example, do you think it makes biological sense, that if one has ran deficits in calories for one week, and then suddenly one night eats 600 calories before bed (when this too is included with their calorie allotment and keeps their calorie deficit), that this will all turn to fat virtually over night?

Example 2: Or thier base calorie need (for doing nothing all day, is 1700 calories, and their running history is the same), and they decide to eat all 1700 just before bed, this will turn ALL to fat? It simply does not work this way. And, some will confuse water-weight-gain (because of the carboHYDRATES) with a body fat gain.

Speaking personally, when I lean down (and keep carbs hovering around 75 to 90--dependent on the phase period), I would eat a protein/carb meal just before bed. The carb meal usually consisted of two servings of old fashioned oats (300) with four table spoons of a fiber supplement (for swelling properties in the stomach), because my hunger was vicious in the mornings, and this stopped it in its tracks. And, I still leaned down over time. In short, its a myth, I'd worry more about one's personal calorie trend, and less on when its eaten (in this circumstance).
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Last edited by Chillen; 08-07-2011 at 10:05 AM.
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