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Old 06-24-2011, 03:27 PM   #4
Fazc
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Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: U.K
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Training Type: Powerlifting
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Unless you specifically want to understand the *why* behind a routine or rep scheme it's not neccesary no.

Personally I find it quite interesting and have a few neuromechanic/kinesiology/anatomy books on my shelf and i've had some discussions on these issues with a few people in-the-know. But rarely has it contributed much to my training. My training info comes from experience, both my own and that of other lifters. The science behind it mainly rationalises *why*. Unless you're on the cutting edge of muscle research it's highly unlikely your interpretation of someone else's text will suddenly enlighten you or anybody else to anything not already well known. So i'll leave all that to the Enoka's of this world.

For example you don't need to know why gravity works, to know that jumping off a tall building might hurt a little. You just need to know that stuff generally goes down. In the same way most who lift weights are interested in the results rather than why they obtain those results, if you see the distinction there.

Last edited by Fazc; 06-24-2011 at 03:29 PM.
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