View Single Post
Old 06-20-2011, 08:24 AM   #7
Spartigus
Senior Member
Max Brawn
Points: 3,966, Level: 40 Points: 3,966, Level: 40 Points: 3,966, Level: 40
Activity: 2% Activity: 2% Activity: 2%
 
Spartigus's Avatar
 

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1,227
Training Exp: 4 years
Training Type: Fullbody
Fav Exercise: Squat & Quick Lifts
Fav Supp: Milk
Reputation: 14113
Spartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributorSpartigus is a dedicated contributor
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BendtheBar View Post
Dmaipa recently wrote an article that referenced something similar. I have not read the study so I will not comment on it specifically.

One thing I will say is that studies often neglect several important factors. These factors vary from study to study, but are important. In this study, for example, the following factors are ignored:

1) 85% for a newbie does not impact the body and its systems in the same way 85% for and experienced intermediate to advanced lifter.

2) Experience level of the lifter. The body responds on a more heightened level for beginners. We all know when training properly, they gain rapidly.

3) Hard work. Numbers can often paint the illusion that someone is working hard. Two different lifters can perform very similar workouts, and one lifter will walk away destroyed while the other lifter may have been pulling back by a rep or two on each set.

Lastly, the body can only hold so much muscle naturally. Natural testosterone levels are one of the limiting factors in this reality. Even if you are able to spike test levels by a little bit each workout using this training, this slight increase would change how big you get in the long run.

With that said, it may be a good style for short term gains, but as we have discussed with the gains curve, everything evens out as long as progression and persistence are in the mix.

I would never dissuade anyone from using the above format. I've used it myself in some form or fashion. But as a study it's incomplete. I know the article as a whole isn't a study, but they did reference "is shown" which means they are basing it on a study or two.
Thats interesting Steve, was hoping for a response like that. This is one of the first times I have actually looked at these hormones past an outline of what they do.

The book is probably focused towards your average Joe Shmo who just picked up a barbell. This is seen through looking at how they manage routines in the text book. I guess this is why quite a few trainers at gyms tend generate a lot of misconceptions in the gym?
__________________
Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.

"When in doubt, just get really, really strong. It tends to cure most problems in training and life." - Wendler
Spartigus is offline   Reply With Quote