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Old 06-08-2011, 09:48 AM   #3
Carl1174
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: South Wales - UK
Posts: 4,786
Training Exp: 3-4 years
Training Type: Fullbody
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The form of progression i used when i first start (and revived again recently doing the Reeves Classic) was the 'one extra rep' form of progression.

Do reps from 8-12 reps, starting at 8, then adding a rep each workout untill you get to 12. Then you up the weight 10% and start again. Not only does this mean you progress quite quickly, it also means there is a built in deload at the end of the sequence. Normally if you can do 12 reps at a given weight you should be able to do 10 reps at 10% higher (mileage may vary), meaning dropping to 8 reps is slightly below where you need to be.

I think this form of progression works best on a 3 day fullbody routine where to exercises are same or very similar for all days. When i first used it i was using a HLM fullbody type of workout so as to not burn out and i just simply added a rep per week. it soon built up to hard work.

The key to it is starting lower than where you are so progression can continue for a while. I would recommend starting at 8 reps with 10% LESS than your current 12 rep max. All those extra reps soon add up and if you start at your current 8 rep max you have no where to go.

Carl.
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