View Single Post
Old 03-30-2011, 09:51 AM   #7
glwanabe
Senior Member
Max Brawn
Points: 15,106, Level: 79 Points: 15,106, Level: 79 Points: 15,106, Level: 79
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,268
Reputation: 150539
glwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master member
Default

[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by BendtheBar View Post
Definitely not discounting slow and controlled.
I think the important variable is the word slow. I'm not a big fan of ultra long rep counts. I prefer to do the rep at a natural pace. I lower the weight a bit slower at heavier weights, but I'm always looking for good speed on the opposite side of the movement.


Quote:
But the other side of the equation is so often discounted as unimportant by some as long as "magic" variables such as TUT are in place.
TUT, is overused as some magical thing that is misunderstood by most people. If TUT was the answer the all we need to do is hold any weight for a longer period of time to improve. This is not the case.

Progression is king, and you simply must look to push more weight for real improvement to take place.


If you use a static hold as a way to increase strength, then 1 minute is your goal. Anytime you can hold a weight for 1 minute in static hold, it is time to increase the weight. beyond 1 minute and you're building endurance, not addtional strength.
glwanabe is offline   Reply With Quote