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Old 03-07-2011, 06:56 PM   #3
MikeM
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I'm not sure what to think of this. I think it depends on what you are trying to do to some extent. Seems like if you want to gain strength relatively quickly and efficiently, then you do need to rest and recover regularly.

However, I worked out five days a week for over a year and never really felt the need for "recovery" and I did gain strength, perhaps not as much as if I had been more efficient, but gains nontheless. I changed exercises pretty regularly to prevent boredom and because I thought a variety of exercises were better overall, and perhaps that staved off a "need" for recovery, but I wonder.

I also think some people can simply recover better than others. There's a guy at my gym that is a master's bodybuilder with a sick physique for 52 years old, and he has worked out 5 days a week, except for two vacations a year, since I have known him (2 years). He always seems to have big weights on the bar too, and it's not like he's dropping the weights way back some weeks either, although maybe I just didn't notice when/if he did.

Anyway, great article. More food for thought. I am pretty sure I will need some regular recovery weeks to reach the goals I have in mind for this year, so it's nice to see there is real science behind including recovery in your program.
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