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Old 01-30-2011, 03:00 PM  
BendtheBar
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Louisiana
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One of the issues I have with split training is that because of its nature, meaning that workouts are divided into bodyparts, compound lifts must be pieced together into nice little compartments so they fit.

Though this is rarely an issue for a semi-seasoned lifter, it creates a lot of confusion for beginners because they are trained to view everything through the lens of bodyparts rather than as individuals movements.

So when they look at fullbody workouts, the workouts are hard to make sense of because they are viewing it though the lens of "this lift is associated with this bodypart."

Another issue with split training, and again this is not a broad condemnation but rather an observation about the consequences of sorting compound lifts by bodypart, is that many will try to turn a compound lift into more of an isolation lift for a certain bodypart.

Bench press, for example, in a split context is seen as a chest lift. Often times the form is tweaked, or training techniques are implemented to try and turn the bench press into more of an isolation lift for chest.

I am not a big fan of this approach. Compound lifts should be performed naturally, in my opinion; using the best form possible. But that is a topic for another thread.

In fullbody training, you do not view lifts through the lens of bodyparts. You view them in their totality.

Often times I will hear..."where is the direct tricep work? This fullbody will make my arms shrink!" But if you look closely at most fullbody workouts, there are often 6-10 working sets per day (including ramped 5x5 programs, etc.) that involve triceps.

You will also hear..."There is not enough quad work! I need leg extensions or leg press..." But if you look closely, there are 6-12 sets of squats per week. Brutal!

Take home point: Do not try to view fullbody workouts through the lens of bodyparts. View the compound lifts as they are, perform them as they were meant to be performed, and do not try to turn them into isolation lifts by tweaking form, or by adding endless advanced training techniques meant to "better isolate" a muscle group.
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Last edited by BendtheBar; 01-30-2011 at 03:04 PM.
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