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Old 01-29-2011, 03:43 PM   #1
Trevor Ross
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 506
Training Exp: 10 years
Training Type: Powerbuilding
Fav Supp: Food
Reputation: 14995
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Default Benefits of the Push/Pull split.

Pull= (Upper back, Lats, Biceps, Forearms, and Hamstrings)
Push=(Chest, Triceps, Quads, Shoulders, and Calves)

1: You get to go to the gym a little more often (something I enjoy).
2: You can train on consecutive days (if you have an unpredictable schedule).
3: I think they promote better recovery then most systems.
4: Squats and Deadlifts have their own days.
5: There's more emphasis on building weak points.
6: The big lifts are still cornerstones of this style of programming.
7: It's another effective option if you're bored with your current program.
8: It splits the body more effectively then the Upper/Lower system.
9: Workouts are still around the one hour mark (providing you regulate the volume properly).
10: You can do more then one exercise per bodypart (you still have to keep volume in mind).

Taylor it to your own needs and style of training.

Last edited by Trevor Ross; 02-01-2011 at 06:02 PM. Reason: glwanabe says I'm wrong.
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