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Old 01-19-2011, 02:50 PM   #185
glwanabe
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Default Some thoughts on progression

I added this content to the first post on progression this morning. One of the most common things people remark about is how sore they are from such little work.

I always tell people to start out with very light weights to begin, and slowly build up until they have established good working numbers to build from. These numbers are always lower than there previous worksets on a split routine. This is a decieving aspect of the volume of work you are actually doing.

Another thread this week also hit on a what I'am talking about.

The basic scheme of a 3x8-12

A 3x8=24 reps pr day, or 72 reps per week
a 3x12= 36 reps pr day, or 108 reps per week

Thats a difference of 36 reps from the low to the high end of the rep spread.

Now lets look at the math of poundage moved.

1x8x140=1120
1x8x175=1400
1x8x210=1680

4200lbs moved for one squat session. adding 1 rep on Wed, and Friday would net.

1x9x140=1260
1x10x140=1400

So, for the week you moved a total of, 13,020lbs for you squat sessions.

Thats a lot of work, and is the bottom of the rep range. Go to the top of the rep range and the weeks work is huge!


3x12x140=5040
3x12x175=6300
3x12x210=7560

Totals out at, 18,900lbs moved for the week. Just for your squat sets.

Add in all the other work you do during a session, and for the week, and you can see just how much weight you are moving. It is a lot!

I have also mentioned to a few people about running the program as a straight 2x12 set rep scheme.

This scheme is viable, and a valuable way to work into the fullbody approach.
It keeps your intensity a little lower, but still has you doing a lot of work.

For anybody that would run the program that way, it would really only be done until you have built up the CNS conditioning to run the full 3x8-12 scheme.

There is so much that can be done with fullbody work. The intermediate version of the Reeves is just one example of an evolution of the program. There are a few other ways it could be worked as well. I'll address those ways in later post.



Quote:
For a progressive set weight scheme you can build reps a little differently.
Here is an example of how you could work a progressive scheme.

Woud look like:

1x12x135
1x12x165
1x8x205, subsequent sessions:
1x9x205, 1x10x205, 1x11x205, 1x12x205

1x12x135 no change
1x8x170 added weight dropped reps
1x8x210 added weight dropped reps

1x12x135 no change
1x9x170 reps climbing
1x8x210 hold steady

1x12x135 no change
1x10x170 reps climbing
1x8x210 hold steady

1x12x135 no change
1x11x170 reps climbing
1x8x210 hold steady

1x12x135 no change
1x12x170 top of rep range reached!
1x8x210 reps start to build next session
1x9x210, 1x10x210, 1x11x210, 1x12x210

2nd and 3rd sets add weight, and drop reps when 3rd set reaches 12 reps.


Using this progressive scheme I would build the sets till the weights looked liked this.

1x12x135
1x12x185 hold at this weight for 2nd set when reached.
1x12x225 when this is completed all sets reset.

1x8x140
1x8x190
1x8x140
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