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Old 01-18-2011, 10:06 AM   #5
glwanabe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BendtheBar View Post
I may have exaggerated the 2 weeks part I think you bring up an important point...DOMs. Far too many beginners beat the snot out of their bodies to the point where they can't move the next day. This is neither needed or necessary.

A rank beginner needs to work on form, so more repetition is beneficial for several. They also need to work on stabilizer muscle strength, so I can see more reps with a lighter weight being helpful as they build stabilizer momentum. Heavy, taxing weight out the gate can also create debilitating DOMs, which can also be a mental deterrent.

It makes sense to me to start slow with higher than normal reps, but once form is ok, confidence is there, and a lifter has improved stabilizers to a minor degree, it's time to start adding some reps and weight. This doesn't have to be ultra rapid. Slow and steady leads to big progress.
Maybe, but a solid month of good ground work should be enough for most people to start adding weight, and actually train. Even if the weight is still a little light, focusing on progression is the key, and a year of doing this will have them WAY down the road from where they started from.
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