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Old 01-18-2011, 09:34 AM   #2
BendtheBar
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I'm sure it can work as long as progression of weight is involved.

A workout that uses light weight and doesn't involve progression of intensity on some level will not yield any noticeable results.

This article took a viable approach...using a higher rep scheme (maybe 12-20)...and skewed it in a completely ineffective manner.

Nearly anything will trigger beginner gains. For rank beginners, as in this study, a volume of reps is probably more effective. It's a great stimulus, and most likely a greater overall training volume.

24 reps x 20 pounds = 480 pounds of volume

5 reps x 50 pounds = 250 pounds of volume

An untrained beginner will most likely get beat up from a greater volume, but this is a near sighted approach. After this wears off, in about 2 weeks, progression takes over and this house of cards crumbles.

Light weight will serve you well for several weeks. And then it all comes back to progression, regardless of your rep range.
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