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Old 01-07-2011, 12:05 PM   #5
BendtheBar
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 79,944
Training Exp: 20+ years
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flow View Post
Sure the point with kcals is existing. As mentioned i cutted down to my current weight but lost mass and strength too,i think i was too fast regarding the reduction (i lost 16kg in 3 months).
I lost weight that rapidly once before and dropped quite a bit of muscle, as I;m sure you can imagine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flow View Post
Ok, so you think the slow progression (IME) is not because of too infrequent training or too less volume/intensity?
I'm not convinced of it being the cause after only 3 weeks. I also don't consider any consistent progression to be slow.

My personal goal is to gain a rep on a lift 3 out of 4 weeks each month. This has served me well over the years, and took me from a small-boned young man into a fairly strong adult.

Also, sometime strength gains are more than a muscle strength issue. Sometimes your connective tissue needs to get stronger, sometimes your stabilizer muscles, and sometimes your overall conditioning needs to improve - as can be the case with a fullbody approach.

Casey Butt, who is the modern expert on fullbody approaches, has said many times that the transition to a fullbody can take a while, and that the CNS (central nervous system) needs some time to adapt to the specific demands.

I've experience firsthand CNS shutdown on many occasions, and now realize that it can have a big impact on strength gains. So my point is this - give a fullbody 2-3 months at minimum. In a perfect world I would like to see every give it a 4-6 month chance so that they can adapt, and allow their CNS and conditioning to catch up to the specific demands.

I don't want to pressure you to stay on this style of training. There are other approaches I like, such as John Christy's A/B split, and upper-lower splits. But I do think you are making good progress, and that the jury is still out...
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